Self-Publishing Insight: JERRY L. JONES, EdD, discusses Go and Come Again: Segregation, Tolerance, and Reflection: A Four-Generation African-American Educational Struggle

Author JERRY L. JONES, EdD is taking his latest book, Go and Come Again: Segregation, Tolerance, and Reflection: A Four-Generation African-American Educational Struggle on tour – a Virtual Book Tour, that is, with Outskirts Press! Technology has created a wide variety of ways to reach audiences all over the world. All it takes is a little thinking outside the box, and nowadays you can market a self-published book in a variety of affordable and impactful ways. Virtual book tours, for example, are a great way to connect with readers from all corners of the globe, all from the comfort of your own home. Join JERRY L. JONES, EdD and Go and Come Again: Segregation, Tolerance, and Reflection: A Four-Generation African-American Educational Struggle as they appear in features and interviews (such as the one below) in the weeks and months ahead!


Luckily for us, JERRY L. JONES, EdD was kind enough to answer a few questions as the tour was getting started so that we can give you a sneak peek into the mind of the creator of Go and Come Again: Segregation, Tolerance, and Reflection: A Four-Generation African-American Educational Struggle.

OP: Tell us a little bit about Go and Come Again: Segregation, Tolerance, and Reflection: A Four-Generation African-American Educational Struggle. What is it about?

Jerry:  My book is about growing up African American in Appalachia in the 1950s and the early 1960s. It is about being an educator and teaching for 52 years. My book analyzes the issues of race, career success, life’s journey, and destiny.

OP: Why did you decide to write this story?

Jerry:  I wrote this book to show respect to the legacy of African Americans of earlier times and honoring those African Americans who are living today. I use this book as a center point for discussions about race relations and analyzing my own life’s story.

OP: What types of readers would be interested in this story?

Jerry: All ages can benefit from reading Go and Come Again.

OP: What is special about your book?  

Jerry:  The pictures are priceless. The humor is real. The details are stunning and the empathy is apparent.

OP: What differentiates it from other books in the same category?

Jerry: Few educators have stayed in the classroom for 50 years; my perspective is different than that of administrators. The Appalachian location is unique.

OP: Have you published any other books? Do you plan to publish more?

Jerry: Yes, and yes.

OP: How can someone learn more about your book or purchase it?

Jerry: To purchase, they can go to my website at https://www.jjonesgladespring.com AND by internet searching, jerry jones glade spring.

OP: Thanks for your time, Jerry! We look forward to learning more about you as you visit other bloggers!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

An African American born in 1947 in the Southwest Virginia small town of Glade Spring, Dr. Jerry L. Jones attended public schools in the era of segregation. He holds a bachelor’s and a master’s degree from Virginia State University and a doctoral degree from Virginia Tech. Starting his teaching career as a high school teacher in Baltimore in 1969, he became a professor at J. Sergeant Reynolds Community College in Richmond in 1974. Returning to his hometown in 2001 to take care of his elderly mother, Jones is currently a professor at Emory & Henry College, which is located only four miles from the Glade Spring home where he grew up and that has been in his family since 1870. With nearly sixty years in education, both as a student and as a teacher, Jones provides a unique prospective about society, education, and minority status in America—past and present. When Jerry Jones’s mother, Mary Waugh, finished the seventh grade in the 1920s, there was no high school for black children in Washington County, Virginia. She and one of her brothers were homeschooled during the eighth grade by a paid teacher. Later, Mary and her brother were sent to Morristown Junior College in Tennessee which—at that point in time—had a high school department. The author details four generations of black public-school education in his hometown, from his great grandfather (a former slave) to his own education, which involved being bused about 60 miles a day to and from high school. With nearly fifty years as a teacher, Jones writes his book as a tribute to the struggles that many African Americans faced in their pursuit of an education. The stories about his family may not be overly unique. However, these stories are representative of the time and of the geographic location. The education of Negro children in the early years of the twentieth century in most Southern school districts was not a priority. This was a case of separate and unequal—a situation which took decades and federal intervention to remedy. Hesitant to call his book autobiographical, Jones does detail many of his life experiences—tracing his journey from the segregated public schools of Virginia, to his college experiences at the historically black Virginia State University, and to his teaching career in Baltimore, Richmond, and Emory. Additionally, he analyzes his own shortcomings and reflects on his personal traits and strengths.

For more information or to contact the author, visit http://www.outskirtspress.comgoandcomeagain

This author purchased the Media Marketing Blitz marketing option, which allows self-publishing authors to connect with bloggers and harness the power of the blogosphere by taking their book on the “virtual road.” Learn more about this service by visiting your Publishing Center and reviewing the available marketing options.

Are you an author looking for help to market your self-published book?

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Outskirts Press Presents Marc Daniels, author of Weed Out the Hate: Plant a Rose

Author Marc Daniels is taking his latest book, Weed Out the Hate: Plant a Rose: A Judaic Tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., on tour—a Virtual Book Tour, that is, with Outskirts Press! Technology has created a wide variety of ways to reach audiences all over the world. All it takes is a little thinking outside the box. Nowadays, you can market a self-published book in a variety of affordable and impactful ways. Virtual book tours, for example, are a great way to connect with readers from all corners of the globe . . . all from the comfort of your own home. Join Marc Daniels and Weed Out the Hate: Plant a Rose as they appear in features and interviews (such as the one below) in the weeks and months ahead!

Luckily for us, Marc Daniels was kind enough to answer a few questions as the tour was getting started so that we can give you a sneak peek into the mind of the creator of Weed Out the Hate: Plant a Rose.

OP: Tell us a little bit about Weed Out the Hate: Plant a Rose. What is it about?

MARC: This is about my personal journey, researching the roots of systemic racism and anti-Semitism and how to draw upon our better angels to rise above the chaos into a better place.

OP: Why did you decide to write this story?

MARC: During my first trip to the Dachau Concentration Camp near Munich, Germany, I was overwhelmed by the shrilling, bone-chilling anger of the mockingbirds and the nightingales. I was convinced that they were heaven-sent angels, telling us to change. These sounds emanated from park trees, lush with blooms and beautiful fragrances. I felt that these birds were attempting to shock the visitors into striving for inner correction as a foundation for repairing the social ills of society.

Since I could not understand their rhetoric directly, I spent the better part of ten years researching the works of Strauss, Shakespeare, Jean-Baptiste Clément, Wolf Biermann, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

OP: What types of readers would be interested in this story?

MARC: People looking for a method to coat and protect their hearts against hate speech on social media and those desiring to take a peaceful stand against racism, promoting compassion and nurturing instincts in others. Any reader interested in Jewish spirituality will be fascinated with the narrative of this book.

Not content to present only the theory, I promoted the concepts in political town hall rope line discussions with Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders, Donald Trump, Mike Pence, Joe Biden, Kamala Harris, and Kirsten Gillibrand.

I provide viable strategies for weeding out hatred and planting roses in people throughout the country.

OP: What differentiates it from other books in the same category?

MARC: This book inspires readers to perceive civil rights and politics through a spiritual lens. It helps the reader better judge the traits necessary to become president of the United States while illuminating the darkness in demagogues attempting to project their deception as truth.

OP: What is unique about your book?  

MARC: As the eldest grandson of the inventor of the Ross Root Feeder, an irrigation tool for watering and feeding tress[AB1]  and rosebushes, I spent years marketing our products to gardeners throughout the country. I experienced multiple mediation moments watching the water swirl premeasured plant food and insecticide tablets into a protective, nurturing tonic, delivered at the deepest roots. For me, the tablets represented our unfeeling, stony hearts.

This upper swirl consists of the musical, lyrical, and instrumental rhetoric, which helps the masses understand and respond positively to the angelic messaging of nature. This book helps decipher the cries of the Dachau songbirds that I could not completely understand at the time but now do.

When we place ourselves in the upper swirl of nature and divinity, we flush out any acculturated systemic racist and bias traits. The tonic becomes spiritual biofuel for the desire to heal the world through nurture and compassion. My character vivified the root feeder that I used to care for plants in the yard and garden.

OP: Have you published any other books? Do you plan to publish more? 

MARC: In 2010, Allegria Verlag of Berlin published my first book Der Himmelsgarten: Das Handbuch des Spirituellen Gärtners. It illustrated how gardening with a spiritual intention could help you restore balance and purpose to your life.

OP: How can someone learn more about your book or purchase it?

MARC:The book is written in the German language and is available through Amazon.de.

OP: Thanks for your time, MARC! We look forward to learning more about you as you visit other bloggers!

For more information or to contact the author, visit www.outskirtspress.com/weedouthate

This author purchased the Media Marketing Blitz marketing option, which allows self-publishing authors to connect with bloggers and harness the power of the blogosphere by taking their book on a “virtual road.” Learn more about this service by visiting your Publishing Center and reviewing the available marketing options.

Are you an author looking for help to market your self-published book?

Outskirts Press Presents Jerry L. Jones, EdD, author of Go and Come Again: Segregation, Tolerance, and Reflection: A Four-Generation African-American Educational Struggle

Author Jerry L. Jones, EdD, is taking his latest book, Go and Come Again: Segregation, Tolerance, and Reflection: A Four-Generation African-American Educational Struggle on tour—a Virtual Book Tour, that is, with Outskirts Press! Technology has created a wide variety of ways to reach audiences all over the world. All it takes is a little thinking outside the box. Nowadays, you can market a self-published book in a variety of affordable and impactful ways. Virtual book tours, for example, are a great way to connect with readers from all corners of the globe . . . all from the comfort of your own home. Join Jerry L. Jones, EdD, and Go and Come Again: Segregation, Tolerance, and Reflection: A Four-Generation African-American Educational Struggle as they appear in features and interviews (such as the one below) in the weeks and months ahead!

Luckily for us, Jerry L. Jones, EdD, was kind enough to answer a few questions as the tour was getting started so that we can give you a sneak peek into the mind of the creator of Go and Come Again: Segregation, Tolerance, and Reflection: A Four-Generation African-American Educational Struggle.

OP: Tell us a little bit about Go and Come Again: Segregation, Tolerance, and Reflection: A Four-Generation African-American Educational Struggle. What is it about?

JERRY: The book is about growing up African American in Appalachia in the 1950s and the early 1960s and becoming an educator, teaching for fifty-two years. I analyze issues of race, career success, life’s journey, and destiny.

OP: Why did you decide to write this story?

JERRY: I wrote it to respect the legacy of African Americans of earlier times and honor those African Americans who are living today. I use the book as a center point for discussions about race relations, analyzing my own life’s story.

OP: What types of readers would be interested in this story?

JERRY: All ages can benefit from reading Go and Come Again.

OP: What is unique about your book?  

JERRY: The pictures are priceless, the humor is real, the details are stunning, and the empathy is apparent throughout the pages.

OP: Have you published any other books? Do you plan to publish more? 

JERRY: Yes, and yes!

OP: What differentiates it from other books in the same category? 

JERRY: Few educators have stayed in the classroom for fifty years; my perspective is different from administrators’. The Appalachian location is unique.

OP: How can someone learn more about your book or purchase it?

JERRY:Information can be found by going to www.jjonesgladespring.com AND internet searching jerry jones glade spring.

OP: Thanks for your time, Jerry! We look forward to learning more about you as you visit other bloggers!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

An African American born in 1947 in the Southwest Virginia small town of Glade Spring, Dr. Jerry L. Jones attended public schools during segregation. He holds a bachelor’s and a master’s degree from Virginia State University and a doctoral degree from Virginia Tech. Starting his teaching career as a high school teacher in Baltimore in 1969, he became a professor at J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College in Richmond in 1974. Returning to his hometown in 2001 to take care of his elderly mother, Jones is currently a professor at Emory & Henry College, located only four miles from the Glade Spring home where he grew up, and that has been in his family since 1870. With nearly sixty years in education, both as a student and teacher, Jones provides a unique perspective about society, education, and minority status in America—past and present. When Jerry Jones’s mother, Mary Waugh, finished the seventh grade in the 1920s, there was no high school for Black children in Washington County, Virginia. She and one of her brothers were homeschooled during the eighth grade by a paid teacher. Later, Mary and her brother were sent to Morristown Junior College in Tennessee, which—at that time—had a high school department. The author details four generations of Black public-school education in his hometown, from his great-grandfather (a former slave) to his own education, which involved being bused about sixty miles a day to and from high school. With nearly fifty years as a teacher, Jones writes his book as a tribute to the struggles many African Americans faced in their pursuit of an education.

The stories about his family may not be overly unique. However, these stories are representative of the time and of the geographic location. The education of Negro children in the early years of the twentieth century in most Southern school districts was not a priority. This was a case of separate and unequal—a situation that took decades and federal intervention to remedy. Hesitant to call his book autobiographical, Jones details many of his life experiences—tracing his journey from the segregated public schools of Virginia to his college experiences at the historically Black Virginia State University and his teaching career in Baltimore, Richmond, and Emory. Additionally, he analyzes his own shortcomings and reflects on his personal traits and strengths.

For more information or to contact the author, visit www.outskirtspress.com/goandcomeagain.

This author purchased the Media Marketing Blitz marketing option, which allows self-publishing authors to connect with bloggers and harness the power of the blogosphere by taking their book on a “virtual road.” Learn more about this service by visiting your Publishing Center and reviewing the available marketing options.

Are you an author looking for help to market your self-published book?

The Winds of Malibu: An Unexplainable Memoir by Jeff Lucas

Technology has created a wide variety of ways to reach audiences all over the world. It takes is a little thinking outside the box and you can market a self-published book in creative, affordable and impactful ways. Consider book tours! Tours are a great way to connect with your readers and technology has made them easier and more cost effective than ever!

Author Jeff Lucas is taking his latest book The Winds of Malibu: An Unexplainable Memoir, on tour — a Virtual Book Tour with Outskirts Press. This will allow Jeff to take his book into the far corners of the globe, all from the comfort of his own home! Keep an eye out for Jeff’s book as he will be featured on several blogs over the weeks and months ahead!


Luckily for us, Jeff was kind enough to answer a few questions as the tour was getting started so that we can give you a sneak peek into the mind of the creator of The Winds of Malibu: An Unexplainable Memoir.

OP: Tell us a little bit about The Winds of Malibu: An Unexplainable Memoir. What is it about?

Jeff: The Winds of Malibu focuses on my teenage years in the 1970s in Malibu. In the 1970s there were outrageous movies being made in abundance, and under the circumstances, I turned the style and the feeling of this book into an outrageous 1970s film because that is how it felt to live there growing up. Everything was on the edge for no real reason at all other than all the personalities involved.

OP: Why did you decide to write this story?

Jeff: The Winds of Malibu was automatic writing on one hand and on the other hand it took decades to complete. I knew I had to finish and publish this eventually. It hung on me for over thirty years. I am grateful that I lived long enough to finish it and publish it. The main challenge was I did not want to face that time that closely, and yet I had to.

OP: What types of readers would be interested in this story?

Jeff: People who like to read the realist writers should be interested in my book. Those interested in Louis Ferdinand Celine, John Fante, and Arthur Rimbaud. In other words, the writers who lived it in order to say it. The Winds of Malibu is really an excellent addition, I think, to learning about the feel of life in the 1970s among youth.

OP: What is special about your book?

Jeff: For a childhood memoir I have more genuine diary entries perhaps than any other childhood memoir. I have asked the Guinness Book Of World records to check on that.

OP: What differentiates it from other books in the same category?

Jeff: Like This Boy’s Life and Running With Scissors? I have got better subject matter.

OP: Have you published any other books? Do you plan to publish more?

Jeff: This might be my To Kill A Mockingbird. No other area of my life had the same intensity. I have got some ideas that I have thought about. There was my first four years in Malibu before I was eleven. After 1984 though, I lived a Blue-Collar life and Charles Bukowski already did a better job of writing about that than I could. I have got a screenplay I sketched out in the 1980s about my Blue-Collar world at the ice company. Maybe I will finish it.

OP: How can someone learn more about your book or purchase it?

Jeff: The Winds of Malibu is available at Barnes & Noble, Amazon, and Outskirts Press.

OP: Thanks for your time, Jeff! We look forward to learning more about you as you visit other bloggers!

Press play to watch the book video for The Winds of Malibu: An Unexplainable Memoir

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Jeff Lucas was a catalyst for local actors his age in Malibu in the 1970s. He is included in the Martin Sheen, Emilio Estevez autobiography, Along The Way (Free Press), and has published two stories in Rosebud Magazine, titled, “Young Frankenstein” and “Buried In The 1980s.”

For more information or to contact the author, visit https://www.outskirtspress.com/thewindsofmalibu

This author purchased the Media Marketing Blitz marketing option, which allows self-publishing authors to connect with bloggers and harness the power of the blogosphere by taking their book on the “virtual road.” Learn more about this service by visiting your Publishing Center and reviewing the available marketing options.

Are you an author looking for help to market your self-published book?

Learn More